Yeast Waffles Worth Waiting For

Hello, friends! We are so close to the weekend I can almost feel it. Do you know what weekends are good for? Sleeping in and brunching. My favorite brunch food {unless mimosas count as a food}: waffles. I used to think that all waffles were created equally. They all had pancake-like elements, but were of course superior because they're waffles for goodness sake. I've tried a handful of homemade waffle recipes in the past, always just settling on the first one that came up in the search results, but never really found a major difference. 

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One day, during my 50th scroll through Pinterest, I stumbled across a new kind of waffle recipe that I decided would be perfect for brunch. I half read the directions like I normally do and then quickly got to work. It wasn't until I started combing ingredients that I realized these waffles were supposed to raise overnight. Oops. Now, to me, waffles that are going to take longer than fifteen minutes to whip up are a waste of my time.  When I decide I want waffles, I want them now. I don't want to wait. I'm happy to tell you that theses waffles changed my mind. I did speed up the process a bit, but the results were ever so wonderful. 

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So let me tell you, your search for the best waffles can end here and now. These are it. I found them and I'm sharing them with you. So plan a bit ahead for brunch, just a bit.  Trust me, it's worth the wait.

Additional advice, actually read the recipe before you start...

I will never learn.

                

 

 

YEAST WAFFLES WORTH WAITING FOR

  • 2 1/4 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda

Place butter and milk in a saucepan and heat until the butter is melted. While waiting for the butter to melt, combine the flour, salt, and baking soda in a separate bowl. Once the butter is completely melted add in the sugar and let it cool until it is lukewarm. It is important that it is not still hot when you add it to the yeast or it will kill the yeast and the waffles will not rise. And who wants flat waffles? Add the yeast to the butter-milk-sugar mixture. Let the mixture set for 5 minutes. It will be slightly bubbly. Combine the dry ingredient mixture to the yeast, butter, and milk. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise for 2-3 hours at room temperature. Once the dough has risen add in the eggs. Grease waffle iron with butter and place 1/2 cup of the waffle batter on the iron. Cook until golden brown. Enjoy! If you will not be enjoying them immediately place them in a 200 degree oven until you are ready to serve. 

Notes: Caramel and whipped cream will take them to the next level! Also, if you decide to go the overnight route, the eggs are not added until the next day, just before cooking. 

Recipe adapted from NY Times Cooking

To Brunch.